ZUMA Simulation Workshop

Time/Room

  • July 28-August 1, 2008, all day
  • This was the last workshop of this type!
  • D 239 (lectures), F 113 (lab courses)

First session

  • 28/07/2008, 10:00 (short introduction)
  • 28/07/2008, 10:30 (first lecture)

Lecturer

Intended Audience

  • see text

Assessment

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Registration

Related Event

Overview

Since 1999, we have offered and often redesigned this workshop on the Koblenz Campus of Koblenz-Landau University. It was  (and will not continue to be) a workshop on the techniques of developing simulations to help with the exploration and understanding of social and economic issues. It will provide a rationale for using simulation in economics and the social sciences and outline a number of approaches to social simulation at a level of detail that would enable participants to understand the literature and, for some selected approaches, to develop their own simulations. The workshop covers the basics of modelling and simulation in economics and the social sciences from different points of view (mathematics, computer science, philosophy of science) and of seven different approaches to computer simulation in economics and the social sciences.

The aim of this module is a broad introduction into all approaches to simulation in the social sciences. Being not only a ZUMA workshop, but also part of the computer science and information management programmes of the Computer Science Faculty of Koblenz-Landau University (KLU), this module is designed for students in their 5th or 7th semester. It covers the basics of modelling and simulation in the social sciences from different points of view (mathematics, computer science, philosophy of science) and of seven different approaches to computer simulation in the social sciences.

By the end of this module, a student should understand

  • what simulation is good for in the social sciences and which steps should be taken to arrive at a useful computer simulation and he or she should know
  • which approaches have been followed by social scientist in the past decades, what the aims of these approaches were and which advantages and shortcomings these approaches have.

    Moreover, students should be able to make use of a number of different simulation tools and have gained some experience in designing their own models.

Syllabus

  1. Simulation and Social Science — history, taxonomy, motives, simulation from a philosophy of science point of view (Monday 10:30-12:00, followed by discussion in small groups)
  2. Simulation as a Method — logic of simulation, stages of simulation-based research (Monday 14-16, followed by reports on discussions)
  3. Systems Dynamics and World Models — classical approaches to macro simulation, differential equations, macro simulation tools, qualitative simulation (Tuesday 9:30-11, followed by hands-on practice with NetLogo in F 113, but only on Wednesday!)
  4. Microanalytical Simulation Models — classical approaches to micro simulation, tax and pension models, recent tools (Tuesday 11:15-12:45)
  5. Queuing Models — discrete event simulation, business process modeling, tools (Tuesday 14:00-15:30)
  6. Multilevel Modelling — modelling global interactions between populations, groups and individuals, stochastic processes, synergetics (Wednesday 9:30-11, followed by hands-on practice with NetLogo in F 113)
  7. Cellular Automata — game theory, modelling local interactions in large populations of identical actors (Thursday 9:30-11, followed by hands-on practice with NetLogo in F 113)
  8. Distributed Artificial Intelligence Models — agent based social simulation (Thursday 14-15:30, followed by hands-on practice with NetLogo in F 113)
  9. Learning and Evolutionary Models — artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms (Friday 9:30-11, followed by plenary discussion until about 16:00)

Teaching material

All slides and a list of references will be available in print. All models discussed during the workshop (and some more) can be found in a WinZip archive

More details will be available here soon.

Information for external participants

Fees for participation are 150 Euro. This covers teaching material, lunch and the cost of the social event. More details will be available here soon.

The Team

Klaus G. Troitzsch gives part of the lectures (chapters 3 through 6).Nigel Gilbert gives part of the lectures (chapters 1, 2 and 7 through 9).Michael Möhring organises the lab.Ulrike May organises accomodation, social event and everything else (and collects the fees).

Basic Reading

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